New England Section of the American Urological Association

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Resident Simulation Training Courses (Cadaver Lab): An Assessment Survey
Michel Apoj, BS1; Mark Biebel, MD1; Archana Rajender, MD1; Dayron Rodriguez, MD, MPH1; Aaron Lentz, MD2; Ricardo Munarriz, MD1
1Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA; 2Duke Raleigh Hospital, Raleigh, NC

BACKGROUND: Penile prosthesis is an effective and safe treatment option for male erectile dysfunction which is associated with high satisfaction rates. Constraints on surgical resident training (work hour mandates and shorter training programs) and insufficient urologic prosthetic urologists in residency academic programs may limit the acquisition of certain surgical skills. As a result, training courses are being conducted to augment the resident penile prosthetic surgery learning experience. Here, we sought to assess if there is a knowledge and self-reported confidence improvement as a result of the simulation training course.
METHODS: As part of the 2017 Society of Urologic Prosthetic Surgeons and the Sexual Medicine Society of North America meeting, 31 residents participated in penile prosthesis lectures and simulation. They filled out surveys before and after this experience. The surveys consisted of 15 multiple choice questions to assess overall knowledge and self-confidence about penile prosthesis surgery. The cadaver knowledge assessment included multiple choice questions with one correct answer. The confidence assessment included a Likert scale to rate self-confidence.
RESULTS: Of the 31 residents (average age 30, median of 28 years old), 7 (22.6%) were female and 24 were male (77.4%). The majority of residents were in their fourth and fifth years of residency (41.9% and 38.7%, respectively). Prior implant experience was assessed by the number of penile prosthesis cases performed before the training course. Residents were grouped into less than 10 cases (35.5%), between 10 and 20 cases (45.2%), and greater than 20 cases (19.4%). The overall survey score mean improvement from before the training to after was statistically significant (68.813.4 vs. 74.2 13.0, p<0.05). The mean self-reported confidence level was statistically higher after the simulation experience (3.9 vs 2.8, p-value <0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Surgical simulation can augment resident surgical training by both increasing resident knowledge and confidence. Limitations of this study include small sample size and data based on survey questions. Studies investigating the efficacy of surgical simulation are still needed.


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